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Ross Ewen Beever

(1946–2010)

MSc Auckland, PhD Leeds FNZIAHS FAPPS FRSNZ

 

Ross Beever FRSNZ

Ross Beever FRSNZ

 

ROSS BEEVER was an exceptional natural scientist. He was New Zealand’s most distinguished mycologist and plant pathologist and his main scientific contribution was in the study of fungi, how they grow, how they behave, and how they may be controlled. He produced new and innovative work as well as combining previous work into new models of fungal behaviour. He also carried out significant studies on the biodiversity of both fungi and higher plants.

Ross was no tree-hugger: instead, he wanted to understand plants and fungi; he examined them critically; he studied them in the laboratory; he analysed his results and he published his findings because he was keen that knowledge be used. He had great breadth of vision with research interests ranging from taxonomy through physiology and biochemistry to genetics and molecular biology. This is shown by his extensive bibliography. The unusual breadth of his vision proved to be a major strength rather than a dilution of his individual efforts, as combined with this coherent vision was a depth of analysis that enabled him to make outstanding contributions to our knowledge. He did not avoid the difficult questions. His work was of basic importance to botanical science and conservation but he was also aware of commercial implications. He therefore undertook quality science relevant to the needs of New Zealand and he often chose deliberately to work on subjects that he knew were ultimately of economic importance. To do this, he drew on his solid background in chemistry, biochemistry and genetics.

Ross was born at Te Kuiti on 3 January 1946. His mother’s family, the Brunskills, had a farm at Glorit, close to the Kaipara Harbour, and adjoining the native bush on Mt Auckland (Atuanui). Ross often visited the farm and he was always at ease in the country, an asset when so many of his scientific projects were in rural settings. His father, Jim Beever, taught in country schools at Piopio and Maungaturoto before shifting to Auckland. Jim Beever was an enthusiastic and knowledgeable amateur botanist, best known for his book A dictionary of Maori plant names, and he instilled in Ross the love of our native flora that he was to retain for the rest of his life.

Ross was educated at Maungaturoto District High School, Remuera Intermediate and Auckland Grammar. He was largely self-taught in biology in his last years at school and it was therefore a special achievement that he was awarded in 1963 the Sinclair Scholarship for the top scholar nationally in biology. The same year he also won a University Junior Scholarship. He continued to excel at Auckland University, winning the Annual Prize in Botany, the Lancaster Memorial Prize, the Frances Briggs Junior and Senior Bursaries and in 1966 was a Senior Scholar in Botany and Chemistry. He then shifted to Mt Albert where he completed an MSc (1st Class Honours) under the supervision of Dr Ted Bollard FRSNZ, co-supervised by Professor Frank Newhook. His thesis topic was “Growth of fungi on potato extract”. “The Barn”, Bollard’s laboratory at the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research (DSIR), was small and crowded with rather makeshift accommodation but it has proved to be extraordinarily influential in New Zealand plant science, producing six Fellows of the Royal Society of New Zealand and another who on shifting to Canberra became a Fellow of the Australian Academy and an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Society of New Zealand. In 1968 Ross was appointed to the staff of Plant Diseases Division, DSIR and he remained with this division and its successor organisations, Plant Protection Division, DSIR and then Landcare Research, for the rest of his life.

In 1969 he was awarded a Sir Walter Mulholland Fellowship and he undertook a PhD at Leeds University, United Kingdom under Professor JRS Fincham FRS, his thesis title being “Genetic and biochemical studies of PEP carboxykinase in Neurospora crassa”. Ross did not travel alone to Leeds but was accompanied by his wife, Jessica, who did a PhD in plant physiology. Ross and Jessica (Spragg) had first met at Remuera Intermediate. They met again at university when both were doing botany and were keen members of the Auckland University Field Club. Both then did masterates based at the DSIR, Mt Albert. They married in 1969 and last year they celebrated 40 years of marriage and friendship together. They had two children, Rosemary and Graham, and in 2009 Graham and Melissa produced the first grandchild, Isabella. Jessica is now a bryologist, working on New Zealand’s moss flora, with Landcare Research, at Tamaki, Auckland.

Ross was to become primarily a plant pathologist and mycologist but he also did innovative work on fungal physiology. His work with Don Burns on phosphate uptake by the fungus Neurospora as a model system was a novel and significant contribution to our understanding of fungal nutrition with implications for both our native plant communities and for pastoral and horticultural cropping and for forestry. Many soils in New Zealand are low in phosphorus and plants rely on fungal symbionts (mycorrhizas) for its uptake. The work established for the first time how plants achieve a constant phosphorus uptake (homeostasis) in the face of a 1000-fold concentration range in the external environment, through relatively small modulations of two coexisting transport systems. These studies in phosphorus uptake culminated in a major review.

Fungi have to respond to stress. Ross demonstrated for the first time that polyols are used by filamentous fungi as compatible solutes, increasing in concentration internally in response to external osmotic stress. This work later linked to a major project Ross developed on the dicarboximide class of fungicides that target the osmo-sensing histidine kinase signalling pathway.

Another contribution of particular note to fungal physiology was his study with Graeme Dempsey of hydrophobins, unique proteins that polymerise into microscopic rodlets on hyphal and spore surfaces, making them water-repellent. Such rodlets play diverse but essential roles in hyphal growth, spore dispersal and the interactions between fungi and plants and animals. The importance and novelty of this work was demonstrated by the appearance of an electron micrograph of the rodlets on the cover of Nature. Subsequently, Ross was part of a team that established the structure of the hydrophobin from Neurospora.

Botrytis cinerea is one of the world’s most destructive fungi. Fungicide resistance poses a particular problem in controlling this disease of grapes, kiwifruit, berryfruit and many ornamentals. Ross together with a number of colleagues made a long-term study of fungicide resistance from the cellular or genetic level to studies of epidemiology and field behaviour. This work focused in particular on resistance to the dicarboximide fungicides first released about 30 years ago for Botrytis control. He and his colleagues surveyed the occurrence of fungicide resistance in New Zealand and developed a model to account for competition between resistant and sensitive strains in the field. He emphasised the balance between the fitness gain associated with the acquisition of resistance and the fitness loss associated with the genetic changes leading to resistance. As well as discovering and characterising the gene associated with dicarboximide resistance (the osmo-sensing histidine kinase), a major paper demonstrated how, at the genetic level, fungal strains in the field continued to evolve in the face of continuing fungicide usage. This applied work was combined with more fundamental studies on the basis of fungicide resistance showing that resistance to dicarboximides is due to a change in the amino acid sequence of histidine kinase, the first enzyme in a major osmo-sensing signalling pathway in fungi. This established the biochemical basis for fungal resistance to dicarboximides. Other work on the genetics of Botrytis showed that populations of the fungus in the wild consist of a series of “vegetative compatibility groups”, a most significant finding which has important implications for the development of biocontrol agents. All these studies underpinned practical management advice to the New Zealand agrichemical industry and to growers on managing fungicide resistance in general.

Chemical control of fungi has obvious limitations. The potential of low-pathogenic strains of Botrytis as novel biocontrol agents was therefore investigated. Another programme initiated with Robyn Howitt and the plant virologists Richard Forster and Mike Pearson explored the potential of mycoviruses as biocontrol agents. Two remarkable viruses were discovered in Botrytis cinerea and characterised. These have subsequently been designated as type species for two new genera within the family Flexivirideae.

The pathology of plants native to New Zealand has traditionally received little attention. This situation changed in the late 1980s when the New Zealand cabbage tree, Cordyline australis, started dying in large numbers. Ross had long had an interest in the botany of the cabbage tree and this, combined with his knowledge of plant diseases, made him the ideal person to lead a team to investigate the “Sudden Decline” of this national icon. There was much public speculation, not always well-informed, as to the possible causes and that the pathological studies were continued to a successful conclusion was in large part due to Ross’s quiet determination. The real cause was found to be a phytoplasma, “Candidatus Phytoplasma australiense”. Phytoplasmas are poorly known organisms that are very difficult to study because they cannot be grown in culture. The work was made even more difficult by the rapid death of the host and the relatively low titre of the pathogen in most parts of affected plants except for some apices of underground rhizomes. This particular phytoplasma is also responsible for Phormium yellows disease (the disease that was partly responsible for flax growing in New Zealand becoming non-commercial), and diseases of strawberries and grapes. There are therefore serious implications for some commercial crops. Coprosma species, particularly C. robusta, act as reservoirs of the pathogen and native plant hoppers Zeoliarus (Oliarus) spp. are perhaps major vectors of the phytoplasma. Sudden Decline of cabbage trees was a very difficult and contentious problem and the resolution brought great satisfaction to those responsible.

The successful elucidation of the cause of cabbage tree Sudden Decline was also due to teamwork. This was typical of Ross, his ability to develop productive collaboration within his discipline and across disciplines both within Landcare Research, and before that, within DSIR, and across institutional boundaries, bringing together specialists of different skills. This collaboration is demonstrated by the many co-authors with whom he published.

Another national icon that is currently being threatened by disease is the kauri, Agathis australis. Ross recognised that Phytophthora was an oomycete genus of major biosecurity importance and a potential risk to our native ecosystems. He helped to clarify the role of P. cinnamomi in native forests and restoration plantings. He led a MAF-funded project clarifying the species of Phytophthora in New Zealand using DNA sequencing techniques and this revealed the presence in the country of P. kernoviae, a potential biosecurity risk. More recently he recognised that species of Phytophthora, including the as-yet undescribed species P. Taxon Agathis, were involved in the death of kauri.

New Zealand fungi have received comparatively little attention. Ross collected numerous novel species and described ten of these. He was co-author of a detailed study of truffle-like fungi, a previously poorly known group of fungi, many of which have their fruiting bodies underground or hidden in litter. He developed the hypothesis that in New Zealand, unlike the rest of the world, they have evolved to be dispersed by (mainly extinct) ground-feeding birds. A particular interest was the mycorrhizal puffball Pisolithus, restricted in New Zealand to thermal areas.

Although Ross was primarily a mycologist and plant pathologist, he also made a number of important botanical contributions. His first botanical discovery of note came at the age of 16 when he re-found and recognised the ‘Waipoua orchid’, previously known from a single rather tattered specimen. This parasitic orchid, associated mainly with taraire trees, was subsequently named Danhatchia australis. Ross continued to investigate many botanical questions and published numerous notes, especially in the Auckland Botanical Society Journal and in Tane, the publication of the Auckland University Field Club. He studied the variants such as the large-leafed forms on offshore islands, he unravelled the self-incompatibility breeding systems of cabbage trees and, in collaboration with Warwick Harris, demonstrated that cabbage trees are adapted to their local environment, thereby providing a scientific basis for the policy of eco-sourcing. Using physiological manipulation, he obtained viable seed of the world’s then rarest plant, a single female of Pennantia baylisiana, thus enabling hundreds of offspring to be grown and hence ensuring its survival. He was a very active member of the Auckland Botanical Society and served as its very effective President from 1983 to 1987. Botany was a hobby as well as a profession.

During his career, Ross received many awards that recognised the excellence of his research. He received DSIR study awards in 1972 and 1980, Trimble Fellowships in 1980 and 1983, and USNZ Cooperative Science Program Awards in 1989 and 1994. He was Principal Investigator on one Marsden Award and Associate Principal Investigator on two others. He was invited speaker at numerous conferences both in New Zealand and overseas. He was the Tennant Lecturer at the University of Otago in 2000. He received the Science and Technology Bronze Medal in 2001 “for significant contributions to mycology and plant pathology”. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of New Zealand in 2004, a Fellow of the New Zealand Institute of Agricultural and Horticultural Science in 2005 and a Fellow of the Australasian Plant Pathology Society in 2009. In 2007 he was, like his father before him, elected an Honorary Member of the Auckland Botanical Society in recognition of all he had done for the Society.

I knew Ross for more than 40 years and I shared a laboratory with him for many years. I quickly learnt to value him as a scientist, as a colleague and as a friend. He was committed to his research, both for its own sake and for the good of the community. He was quietly determined – even stubborn – and at times this was very necessary, especially in the discussions on Sudden Decline of cabbage trees. However, he never allowed disagreements to become personalised. At worst, he would become very quiet or mutter, fortunately in private, “lightweight” – a term he usually restricted to managers or administrators. He did himself take on administrative duties but out of a sense of duty, and his productivity remained remarkably constant throughout his scientific career. His insistence on quality and his willingness to collaborate made him an excellent mentor of younger scientists.

Ross died prematurely at 64 when he still had much work left to finish and manuscripts to write. It is natural to regret the things left undone and the things that might yet have been achieved. Instead I prefer to remember his many remarkable achievements and what he brought to our lives. His career and his personality are well summarised in an email I received from an old friend and mycological colleague, Gary Samuels: “Ross was among the nicest and smartest people I ever knew. He was an amazing empirical scientist and naturalist who represented the best of New Zealand.”

I thank Dr Jessica Beever for assistance and for allowing me to read autobiographic notes prepared by Ross. I also thank Priscilla Cameron and Stan Bellgard, Landcare Research, Tamaki, and Maureen Young, Auckland Botanical Society, for assistance in preparing the bibliography, and Mark Andersen, Mike Pearson, Erik Rikkerink and Matt Templeton for helpful comments.

Publication list

(not including most unpublished reports or abstracts)

Fungal genetics and plant pathogenesis

Hartill, W. F. T.; Beever, R. E.; Brook, P. J. 1975: Fungicide resistance: an approach to the problem. Proceedings of the 28th New Zealand Weed and Pest Control Conference: 130–132.

Beever, R. E. 1982: Resistance to fungicides: not always a problem? Pp. 37–42 (plus discussion pp. 43–46) in: Geelen, J. A.; Esson, M. J. ed., Pesticide resistance seminar. Hastings, 19 May 1982, The Hawke’s Bay Branch of the New Zealand Weed and Pest Control Society.

Beever, R. E.; Byrde, R. J. W. 1982: Resistance to the dicarboximide fungicides. Pp. 101–117 in: Dekker, J.; Georgopoulos, S. G. ed., Fungicide Resistance in Crop Protection. Wageningen, Pudoc.

Beever, R. E.; Hartill, W. F. T.; Brien, H. M. R. 1982: Resistance to dicarboximide fungicides in Botrytis cinerea in New Zealand. ISPP [International Society for Plant Pathology] Chemical Control Newsletter No.1: 12–13.

Beever, R. E.1983: Osmotic sensitivity of fungal variants resistant to dicarboximide fungicides. Transactions of the British Mycological Society 80: 327–331.

Beever, R. E.; Brien, H. M. R. 1983: A survey of resistance to the dicarboximide fungicides in Botrytis cinerea. New ZealandJournal of Agricultural Research 26: 391–400.

Hoksbergen, K. A.; Beever, R. E. 1984: Control of low-level dicarboximide-resistant strains of Botrytis cinerea by dicarboximide fungicides. New Zealand Journal of Agricultural Research 27: 107–111.

Beever, R. E.; Munro, K.; Laracy, E. P.; Long, P. G. 1985: Resistance of Botrytis cinerea to the dicarboximide fungicides. Te Kauwhata Research Station Oenological and Viticultural Bulletin 46: 41–54.

Beever, R. E.; O'Flaherty, B. F. 1985: Low-level benzimidazole resistance in Botrytis cinerea in New Zealand. New Zealand Journal of Agricultural Research 28: 289–292.

Laracy, E. P.; Beever, R. E. 1985/1986: Fungicide-resistant strains of botrytis in New Zealand vineyards. Southern Horticulture Grapegrower and Winemaker No. 3, 1985/86 edn: 50–52.

Beever, R. E. 1986: Sensible fungicide use for Botrytis control. DSIR Biological Industries Group Newsletter No. 12: 6.

Beever, R. E.; Elvidge, J. 1986: Green fruit rot of apricot caused by Botrytis cinerea resistant to benzimidazole fungicides. New Zealand Journal of Agricultural Research 29: 299–304.

Buchanan, P. K.; Beever, R. E.1987: Botryosphaeria rot of grapes. Australian Microbiologist 8: 209.

Pak, H. A.; Beever, R. E.; Laracy, E. P. 1987: Update on control of Botrytis with fungicides. Te Kauwhata Research Station Oenological and Viticultural Bulletin 51: 103–114.

Beever, R. E. 1988a: New Zealand Committee on Pesticide Resistance (NZCPR). ISSP [International Society for Plant Pathology] Chemical Control Newsletter No. 10: 15.

Beever, R. E. 1988b: Research workers on fungicide resistance in New Zealand – 1988. ISSP [International Society for Plant Pathology] Chemical Control Newsletter No. 11: 24–25.

Beever, R. E.; Hartill, W. F. T. 1988: Botrytis advice refuted. Horticulture News 10(2): 21.

Beever, R. E.; Pak, H. A. 1988: The future of fungicides in the control of Botrytis. Pp. 85–88 in: Smart, R. E.; Thornton, R. J.; Rodriguez, S. B.; Young, J. E. ed., Proceedings of the Second International Symposium for Cool Climate Viticulture and Oenology. 11–15 January 1988. Auckland, New Zealand Society for Viticulture and Oenology.

Pennycook, S. R.; Beever, R. E.1988: DSIR advice on fungicides. New Zealand Kiwifruit 43 (March 1988): 24.

Pennycook, S. R.; Beever, R. E. 1988: Kiwifruit fungicides. New Zealand and Southern Horticulture 5(3): 3.

Beever, R. E. 1989: Book review. Fungicide Resistance in North America. New Zealand Journal of Crop and Horticultural Science 17: 305–306.

Beever, R. E.; Laracy, E. P.; Pak, H. A. 1989: Strains of Botrytis cinerea resistant to dicarboximide and benzimidazole fungicides in New Zealand vineyards. Plant Pathology 38: 427–437.

Beever, R. E.; Pennycook, S. R. 1990: Book review. Compendium of Grape Disease. New Zealand Journal of Crop and Horticultural Science 18: 165–166.

Pak, H. A.; Beever, R. E.; Laracy, E. P. 1990: Population dynamics of dicarboximide-resistant strains of Botrytis cinerea on grapevine in New Zealand. Plant Pathology 39: 501–509.

Pennucci, A.; Beever, R. E.; Laracy, E. P. 1990: Dicarboximide-resistant strains of Microdochium nivale in New Zealand. Australasian Plant Pathology 19: 38–41.

Beever, R. E.; Pak, H. A.; Laracy, E. P. 1991: An hypothesis to account for the behaviour of dicarboximide-resistant strains of Botrytis cinerea in vineyards. Plant Pathology 40: 342–346.

Beever, R. E.; Parkes, S. L. 1993: Mating behaviour and genetics of fungicide resistance of Botrytis cinerea in New Zealand. New Zealand Journal of Crop and Horticultural Science 21: 303–310.

Beever, R. E.; Olsen, T. L.; Parkes, S. L. 1995: Vegetative compatibility groups in Colletotrichum gloeosporioides (Glomerella cingulata) from apple and other fruits. Australasian Plant Pathology 24: 126–132.

Howitt, R. L. J.; Beever, R. E.; Pearson, M. N.; Forster, R. L. S. 1995: Presence of double-stranded RNA and virus-like particles in Botrytis cinerea. Mycological Research 99: 1472–1478.

Skipp, R. A.; Beever, R. E.; Sharrock, K. R.; Rikkerink, E. H. A.; Templeton, M. D. 1995: Colletotrichum. Pp. 119–143 in: Pathogenesis and Host Specificity in Plant Diseases. Histopathological, Biochemical, Genetic, and Molecular Bases, Volume II: Eukaryotes. Kohmoto, K.; Singh, U. S.; Singh, R. P. ed. Oxford, Elsevier Science.

Weeds. P. L.; Beever, R. E.; Long, P. G. 1998: New genetic markers for Botrytis cinerea (Botryotinia fuckeliana). Mycological Research 102: 791–800.

Beever, R. E. 1999: Killing plants: prospects for novel herbicides using microbes. Pp. 69–71 in: Lee, W.G. ed. Proceedings Workshop Forum on Invasive Weeds: Setting New Priorities. Hamilton, New Zealand, 19 May, 1999. Lincoln, Landcare Research.

Weeds, P. L. Beever, R. E.; Sharrock, K. R.; Long, P. G. 1999: A major gene controlling pathogenicity in Botryotinia fuckeliana (Botrytis cinerea). Physiological and Molecular Plant Pathology 54: 13–35.

Weeds, P. L.; Beever, R. E.; Long, P. G. 2000: Competition between aggressive and non-aggressive strains of Botrytis cinerea (Botryotinia fuckeliana) on French bean leaves. Australasian Plant Pathology 29: 200–204.

Howitt, R. L. J.; Beever, R. E.; Pearson, M. N.; Forster, R. L. S. 2001: Genome characterization of a Botrytis virus F, a flexuous rod-shaped mycovirus resembling plant ‘potex-like’ viruses. Journal of General Virology 82: 67–78.

Cui, W.; Beever, R. E.; Parkes, S. L.; Weeds, P. L.; Templeton, M. D. 2002: An osmosensing histidine kinase mediates dicarboximide fungicide resistance in Botrytotinia fuckeliana (Botrytis cinerea). Fungal Genetics and Biology 36: 187–198.

Beever, R. E.; Parkes, S. L. 2003:Use of nitrate non-utilising (Nit) mutants to determine vegetative compatibility in Botryotinia fuckeliana (Botrytis cinerea). European Journal of Plant Pathology 109: 607–613.

Beever, R. E.; Weeds, P. L. 2004: Taxonomy and genetic variation of Botrytis and Botryotinia. Pp. 29–52 in: Elad, Y., Williamson, B., Tudzynski, P., Delen, N. ed. Botrytis: Biology, Pathology, and Control. Dordrecht, Kluwer Academic Publishers.

Cui, W.; Beever, R .E.; Parkes, S. L.; Templeton, M. D. 2004: Evolution of an osmosensing histidine kinase in field strains of Botryotinia fuckeliana (Botrytis cinerea) in response to dicarboximide fungicide usage. Phytopathology 94: 1129–1135.

Tsai, P.-F.; Pearson, M. N.; Beever, R. E. 2004: Mycoviruses in Monilinia fructicola. Mycological Research 108: 907–912.

Beever, R. E.; Plummer, K. M.; Wurms, K. V. 2005: Novel approaches to controlling fruit pathogens. New Zealand Plant Protection 58: 68–73.

Howitt, R. L. J.; Beever, R. E.; Pearson, M. N.; Forster, R. L. S. 2006: Genome characterization of a flexuous rod‑shaped mycovirus, Botrytis virus X, reveals high amino acid identity to genes from plant 'potex-like' viruses. Archives of Virology 151: 563–579.

Pearson, M. N.; Clover, G. R. G.; Guy, P. L.; Fletcher, J. D.; Beever, R. E. 2006 A review of the plant virus, viroid and mollicute records for New Zealand. Australasian Plant Pathology 35: 217–252.

Beever, R. E.; Parkes, S. L. 2007: Vegetative compatibility groups in Cryptosporiopsis actinidiae. New Zealand Journal of Crop and Horticultural Science 35: 67–72.

Braithwaite, M.; Inglis, C.; Dick, M. A.; Ramsfield, T. D.; Waipara, N.W.; Beever, R.E.; Pay, J. M.; Hill, C. F. 2007: Investigation of oak tree decline in the Auckland region. New Zealand Plant Protection 60: 297–303.

Pearson M. N.; Beever, R. E.; Boine, B.; Arthur, K. 2009: Review: Mycoviruses of filamentous fungi and their relevance to plant pathology. Molecular Plant Pathology 10: 115–128.

Fungal physiology

Beever, R. E. 1970: Some studies on the nutrition of Peniophora sacrata G.H. Cunn. New Zealand Journal of Science 13: 160–165.

Beever, R. E.; Bollard, E. G. 1970: The nature of the stimulation of fungal growth by potato extract. Journal of General Microbiology 60: 273–279.

Beever, R. E. 1973: Pyruvate carboxylase in N. crassasuc’ mutants. Neurospora Newsletter 20: 15–16.

Beever, R. E.; Fincham, J. R. S. 1973: Acetate-nonutilizing mutants of Neurospora crassa: acu‑6, the structural gene for PEP carboxykinase and inter-allelic complementation at the acu‑6 locus. Molecular and General Genetics 126: 217–226.

Beever, R. E. 1975: Regulation of 2-phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and isocitrate lyase syntheses in Neurospora crassa. Journal of General Microbiology 86: 197–200.

Beever, R. E.; Burns, D. J. W. 1977: Adaptive changes in phosphate uptake by the fungus Neurospora crassa in response to phosphate supply. Journal of Bacteriology 132: 520–525.

Beever, R. E.; Burns, D. J. W. 1977: Microorganisms and the phosphorus cycle: some physiological considerations. Reviews in Rural Science (University of New England, Armidale) 3: 113–118.

Burns, D. J. W.; Beever, R. E. 1977: Kinetic characterization of the two phosphate uptake systems in the fungus Neurospora crassa. Journal of Bacteriology 132: 511–519.

Beever, R. E.; Burns, D. J. W. 1978: Does cycloheximide-induced loss of phosphate uptake activity in Neurospora crassa reflect rapid turnover? Journal of Bacteriology 134: 1176–1178.

Beever, R. E.; Dempsey, G. P. 1978: Function of rodlets on the surface of fungal spores. Nature 272: 608–610. [plus cover photograph]

Burns, D.J.W.; Beever, R. E. 1978: Physiology of P release from fungi - implications for the P cycle. Pp.156–160 in: Loutit, M. W.; Miles, J. A. R. ed., Microbial Ecology. Berlin, Springer-Verlag.

Beever, R. E.; Redgwell, R. J.; Dempsey, G. P. 1979. Purification and chemical characterization of the rodlet layer of Neurospora crassa conidia. Journal of Bacteriology 140: 1063–1070.

Burns, D. J. W.; Beever, R. E. 1979. Mechanisms controlling the two phosphate uptake systems in Neurospora crassa. Journal of Bacteriology 139: 195–204.

Dempsey, G. P.; Beever, R. E. 1979: Electron microscopy of the rodlet layer of Neurospora crassa conidia. Journal of Bacteriology 140: 1050–1062.

Beever, R. E. 1980: A gene influencing spiral growth of Neurospora crassa hyphae. Experimental Mycology 4: 338–342.

Beever, R. E.; Burns, D. J. W. 1980: Phosphorus uptake, storage and utilization by fungi. Advances in Botanical Research 8: 127–219.

Hallett, I. C.; Beever, R. E. 1981: Rodlets on the surface of Neurospora conidia. Transactions of the British Mycological Society 77: 662–665.

Beever, R. E.; Laracy, E. P. 1986: Osmotic adjustment in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans. Journal of Bacteriology 168: 1358–1365.

Beever, R. E.; Parkes, S. L. 1993: Variation of Pithomyces chartarum, causal agent of facial eczema. New Zealand Veterinary Journal 41: 219.

Templeton, M. D.; Rikkerink, E. H. A.; Beever, R. E. 1994: Small, cysteine-rich proteins and recognition in fungal-plant interactions. Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions 7: 320–325.

Templeton, M. D.; Greenwood, D. R.; Beever, R. E. 1995: Solubilization of Neurospora crassa rodlet proteins and identification of the predominant protein as the proteolytically processed eas (ccg-2) gene product. Experimental Mycology 19: 166–169.

Templeton, M. D.; Beever, R. E. 1997: Structure and function of hydrophobins: fungal proteins with unique biophysical properties. N.Z. Bioscience 5(4): 6–11.

Winefield, R. E.; Hilario, E.; Beever, R. E.; Haverkamp, R. G.; Templeton, M. D. 2007: Hydrophobin genes and their expression in conidial and aconidial Neurospora species. Fungal Genetics and Biology 44: 250–257.

Sunde, M.; Kwan, A. H. Y.; Templeton, M. D.; Beever, R. E.; Mackay, J. P . 2008: Structural analysis of hydrophobins. Micron 39: 773–784.

Diseases of the native flora

Beever, R. E. 1990: Sudden Decline of cabbage trees - an update. New Zealand Botanical Society Newsletter No. 22: 6–7.

Beever, R. E. 1991: Death by any other name. New Zealand Botanical Society Newsletter 25: 20–21.

Beever, R. E. 1992: Letter quoted in Brown, C. Harakeke disease. Aotearoa Moananui A Kiwa Weavers No.14: 10–11.

Beever, R. E. 1992. Investigations of the cause of sudden decline of cabbage tree: final report. [Auckland], DSIR Plant Protection Division. (unpublished report)

Beever, R.; Forster, R. 1992: The DSIR (now Crown Research Institute) replies. New Zealand Geographic 15: 8.

Beever, R. E.; Forster, R. L. S. 1995: Sudden Decline of cabbage tree (Cordyline australis): search for the cause. Ecological Society Newsletter 79: 8.

Beever, R. E.; Forster, R. L. S.; Rees-George, J.; Robertson, G. I.; Wood, G.A.; Winks, C.J. 1996. Sudden Decline of cabbage tree (Cordyline australis): search for the cause. New Zealand Journal of Ecology 20: 53–68.

Liefting, L. W.; Andersen, M. T.; Beever, R. E.; Gardner, R. C.; Forster, R. L. S. 1996: Sequence heterogeneity in the two 16S rRNA genes of Phormium yellow leaf phytoplasma. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 62: 3133–3139.

Liefting, L. W.; Beever, R. E.; Winks, C. J.; Pearson, M. N.; Forster, R. L. S. 1997: Planthopper transmission of Phormium yellow leaf phytoplasma. Australasian Plant Pathology 26: 148–154.

Andersen, M. T.; Beever, R. E.; Gilman, A. C.; Liefting, L. W.; Balmori, E.; Beck, D. L.; Sutherland, P. W.; Bryan, G. T.; Gardner, R. C.; Forster, R. L. S. 1998: Detection of phormium yellow leaf phytoplasma in New Zealand flax (Phormium tenax) using nested PCRs. Plant Pathology 47: 188–196.

Liefting, L. W.; Padovan, A. C.; Gibb, K. S.; Beever, R. E.; Andersen, M. T.; Newcomb, R. D.; Beck, D. L.; Forster, R. L. S. 1998. “Candidatus Phytoplasma australiense” is thephytoplasma associated with Australian grapevine yellows, papaya dieback and Phormium yellow leaf diseases. European Journal of Plant Pathology 104: 619–623.

Beever, R. E. 1999: Sudden decline and flowering in ti kouka. Wellington Botanical Society Newsletter April 1999: 13.

Beever, R. E.; Andersen, M. T.; Winks, C. J.; Wood, G. A.; Sutherland, P. W.; Forster, R. L. S. 2000. Phytoplasma diseases of native plants in New Zealand. Pp. 7–12 in: Miller, H. ed., Mundulla Yellows: a New Threat to our Native Vegetation - Meeting the Challenge. Adelaide, Australia, Conservation Council of South Australia.

Andersen, M. T.; Beever, R. E.; Sutherland, P. W.; Forster, R. L. S. 2001: Association of “Candidatus Phytoplasma australiense” with sudden decline of cabbage tree in New Zealand. Plant Disease 85: 462–469. [plus cover photograph]

Beever, R. 2001: Phytoplasmas, a new threat to New Zealand plants? Auckland Botanical Society Journal 56: 24–26.

Johnston, P. R.; Horner, I. J.; Beever, R. E. 2003: Phytophthora cinnamomi in New Zealand’s indigenous forests. Pp. 41–48 in: McComb, J. A.; Hardy, G. E. StJ.; Tommerup, I. C. ed. Proceedings Second International IUFRO Working Party 7.02.09 Meeting on Phytophthora in Forests and Natural Ecosystems, 30 Sept–5 Oct 2001, Albany, Western Australia. Perth, Murdoch University Print.

Beever, R. E.; Wood, G. A.; Andersen, M. T.; Pennycook, S. R.; Sutherland, P. W.; Forster, R. L. S. 2004: "Candidatus Phytoplasma australiense' in Coprosma robusta in New Zealand. New Zealand Journal of Botany 42: 663–675.

Andersen, M. T.; Newcomb, R. D.; Liefting, L. W.; Beever, R. E. 2006: Phylogenetic analysis of “Candidatus Phytoplasma australiense” reveals distinct populations in New Zealand. Phytopathology 96: 838–845.

Beever, R. [E.] 2006: Why are the cabbage trees dying? 2005 Annual Report, The Royal Society of New Zealand: 108–109.

Liefting, L. W.; Andersen, M. T.; Lough, T. J.; Beever, R. E. 2006: Comparative analysis of the plasmids from two isolates of “Candidatus Phytoplasma australiense”. Plasmid 56: 138–144.

Beever, R. E.; Harman, H. M.; Waipara, N. W.; Paynter, Q.; Barker, G. M., Burns, B. 2007: Native flora biosecurity impact assessment. Landcare Research Contract Report LC0607/196. Prepared for MAF Biosecurity New Zealand. Auckland, Landcare Research, 2 vol.

Liefting, L. W.; Beever, R. E.; Andersen, M. T.; Clover, G. R. G. 2007: Phytoplasma diseases in New Zealand. Bulletin of Insectology 60: 165–166.

Schmidt, K.; Wratten, S. D.; Teulon, D. A. J.; Jaspers, M. V.; Beever, R. E. 2007: Population dynamics of the New Zealand flower thrips (Thrips obscuratus) and possible consequences for the incidence of Botrytis bunch rot in grapes. [Abstract]. Journal of Insect Science 7: Paper 28.

Tompkins, D; Beever, R. 2007: Waging war on emerging diseases. Landcare Research Discovery No. 15: 6–8.

Beever, R. E.; Waipara, N. W.; Ramsfield, T. D.; Dick, M. A.; Horner, I. J. 2009: Kauri (Agathis australis) under threat from Phytophthora? Pp. 74–85 in: Goheen, E. M.; Frankel, S. J., technical coordinators. Proceedings, Fourth Meeting of the International Union of Forest Research Organizations (IUFRO) Working Party S07.02.09: Phytophthoras in Forests and Natural Ecosystems. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-221. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station.

Coffin, A.; van Eyndhoven, E.; Beever, R. E.; Bellgard, S.J.; Harman, H. M.; Harmsworth, G.; Scheele, S. M.; Horn, C.; Martin, N. A. 2009: Native flora impact assessment. Biosecurity New Zealand Technical Paper 2009/32. [Wellington], Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry.

Ramsfield, T. D.; Dick, M. A.; Beever, R. E.; Horner, I. J.; McAlonan, M. J.; Hill, C. F. 2009: Phytophthora kernoviae in New Zealand. Pp. 47–53 in: Goheen, E. M.; Frankel, S. J., technical coordinators. Proceedings of the fourth meeting of the International Union of Forest Research Organizations (IUFRO) Working Party S07.02.09: Phytophthoras in Forests and Natural Ecosystems. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-221. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station.

Beever, R. E.; Tsai, S.; Waipara, N. W. 2010: Pathogenicity of Phytophthora taxon Agathis (PTA). P. 39 in: Meeting Abstracts of the 5th International Union of Forest Research Organizations (IUFRO) Phytophthora in Forests and Natural Ecosystems, 7-12 March 2010, Rotorua.

Bellgard, S. E.; Paderes, E. P; Beever, R. E.2010: Comparative efficacy of hygiene treatments used for disinifestation of Phytophthora Taxon Agathis (PTA) inoculums contained in soil. P. 79 in:Meeting Abstracts of the 5th International Union of Forest Research Organizations (IUFRO) Phytophthora in Forests and Natural Ecosystems, 7-12 March, 2010, Rotorua.

Waipara, N.; Davis, A.; Hill, S.; Brooks, J.; Pengelly, M.; Barr, J.; Bellgard, S.; Beever, R. E. 2010: Management of Kauri dieback and Phytophthora Taxon Agathis. P. 42 in: Meeting Abstracts of the 5th International Union of Forest Research Organizations (IUFRO) Phytophthora in Forests and Natural Ecosystems, 7-12 March 2010, Rotorua.

Fungal biodiversity

Beever, R. E. 1984: Book review. Pacific Mycogeography: a preliminary approach. New Zealand Journal of Botany 22: 595–597.

Beever, R. E. 1989: Book review. The Clavarioid Fungi of New Zealand. New Zealand Journal of Botany 27: 316–317.

Segedin, B.; Beever, R.; Johnston, P.; Buchanan, P. 1991: The fifth kingdom: moulds, mushrooms and their kin. New Zealand Geographic 11: 82–95.

Beever, R.; Buchanan, P.; Segedin, B. 1993: [Letter to editor] Shaking the bottle. New Zealand Listener 19 June, 1993: 15.

Beever, R. E. 1994: Truffle-like fungi: fruit of the forest floor. Ecological Society Newsletter 74: 14.

Castellano, M. A.; Beever, R. E. 1994: Truffle-like Basidiomycotina of New Zealand: Gallacea, Hysterangium, Phallobata, and Protubera. New Zealand Journal of Botany 32: 305–328.

Johnston, P. R.; Beever, R. E. 1994: Elsinoë dracophylli sp. nov. New Zealand Journal of Botany 32: 519–520.

Buchanan, P.; Beever, R. 1995: The fungi - red data list in preparation. Threatened Plants News No. 7: 2–3.

Horrocks, M.; Jones, M.; Beever, R.; Sutton, D. 2001. Gourds, truffles and coprolites. New Zealand Geographic 51: 8–9.

Horrocks, M., Jones, M. D., Beever, R. E., Sutton, D. G. 2002: Analysis of plant microfossils in prehistoric coprolites from Harataonga Bay, Great Barrier Island, New Zealand. Journal of the Royal Society of New Zealand 32: 617–628.

Moyersoen, B.; Beever, R. E.; Martin, F. 2003. Genetic diversity of Pisolithus in New Zealand indicates multiple long-distance dispersal from Australia. New Phytologist 160: 569–579.

[Beever, R. E. collator] 2004. Illustrations of some distinctive ascomycete and basidiomycete fungi. Pp. xv-xx + plates 1–16 in: McKenzie, E. H. C. ed. Introduction to Fungi of New Zealand. Fungi of New Zealand Vol. 1. Fungal Diversity Research Series 14. Hong Kong, Fungal Diversity Press.

Buchanan, P. K.; Beever, R. E.; Galloway, D. J.; Glare, T. R.; Johnston, P. R.; McKenzie, E. H. C.; di Menna, M. E.; Pennycook, S. R.; Ridley, G. S.; Smith, J. M. B.; Stephenson, S. L. 2004. The Fungi of New Zealand - An Introduction. Pp. 1–48 in: McKenzie, E. HC. ed. Introduction to Fungi of New Zealand. Fungi of New Zealand Vol. 1. Fungal Diversity Research Series 14. Hong Kong, Fungal Diversity Press.

Moyersoen, B.; Beever, R. E. 2004: Abundance and characteristics of Pisolithus ectomycorrhizas in New Zealand geothermal areas. Mycologia. 96: 1225–1232.

Beever, R. E.; Johnston, P. R.; Buchanan, P. K.; McKenzie, E. H. C. 2006. The hidden kingdoms: fungi, lichens and some bacteria. Pp. 102–113 in: Harvey, B.; Harvey, T. ed. Waitakere Ranges: Ranges of Inspiration. Auckland, The Waitakere Ranges Protection Society.

Hosaka, K., Bates, S. T.; Beever. R. E.; Castellano, M. A.; Colgan III, W.; Domínguez, L. S., Nouhra, E. R.; Geml, J.; Giachini, A. J.; Kenney, S. R.; Simpson, N. B.; Spatafora, J. W.; Trappe, J. M. 2006: Molecular phylogenetics of the gomphoid-phalloid fungi with an establishment of the new subclass Phallomycetidae and two new orders. Mycologia 98: 949–959.

Beever, R. E. 2007: Notes on Chatham Island fungi and some plant pests. Journal of the Auckland Botanical Society 62: 28–31.

Beever, R. E.; Johnston, P. R. 2007: Fungi. Pp. 145–152 in: Wilcox, M. D. ed. Natural History of Rangitoto, Hauraki Gulf, Auckland, New Zealand. Auckland, Auckland Botanical Society.

Johnston, P.; Buchanan, P.; Beever, R.; Paulus, B. 2007: A Guide to Some Common Macrofungi of New Zealand. Auckland, Landcare Research.

Bridge, P. D.; Spooner, B. M.; Beever, R. E.; Park, D.-P. 2008: Taxonomy of the fungus commonly known as Stropharia aurantiaca, with new combinations in Leratiomyces. Mycotaxon 103: 109–121.

Johnston, P.; Beever, R. E. 2008: Fungi. Pp. 113, 115 in: Miskelly, P. ed. Chatham Islands: Heritage and Conservation. Christchurch, Canterbury University Press.

Randall, S. D.; Burns, B. R.; Bellgard, S. E.; Beever, R. E. 2010: Fishing for Phytophthora in the Waitakere Ranges, Auckland, New Zealand. P. 102 in:Meeting Abstracts of the 5th International Union of Forest Research Organizations (IUFRO) Phytophthora in Forests and Natural Ecosystems, 7-12 March 2010, Rotorua.

Plant biodiversity and conservation

Jane, G.; Beever, R. E. 1965: A list of the vascular plants of Motu Muka (Hen and Chickens group). Tane 11: 87–91.

Beever, R. E.; Jane, G. T. 1967: Additional plant records from North Cape. Tane 13: 147–148.

Beever, R. E.; Spragg, J. E.; Dickson, E. M. 1968: A species-area curve for a Leptospermum forest stand. Tane 14: 93–99.

Beever, R. E.; Beever, J. E. 1969: Studies on the vegetation of Cuvier Island. II. Structure of the forest. Tane 15: 69–74.

Beever, R. E.; Parris, B. S.; Beever, J. E. 1969: Studies on the vegetation of Cuvier Island. I. The plant communities and a vascular plant species list. Tane 15: 53–68.

Beever, R. E.; Beever, J.[Jim] 1974: Yoania australis in the Waitakeres. Auckland Botanical Society Newsletter 31(1): 1–3.

Beever, R. E.; Beever, J. E. 1974: Leaf size in Aristotelia serrata. Auckland Botanical Society Newsletter 31(2): 13–14.

Beever, R. E.; Beever, J. [Jim] 1976: Astelia grandis is aptly named. Auckland Botanical Society Newsletter 33(2): 1.

Beever, R. E. 1981: Self-incompatibility in Cordyline kaspar (Agavaceae). New Zealand Journal of Botany 19: 13–16.

Beever, R. E. 1982: Lord Howe Island: a northern outlier of New Zealand? Auckland Botanical Society Newsletter 37(1): 6–7.

Beever, R. E. 1982: Submission on proposed forest park at Cornwallis, Auckland Botanical Society, December 1981. Auckland Botanical Society Newsletter 37(2): 1–10.

[Beever, R. E.] 1983: Paspalum. Auckland Botanical Society Newsletter 38(1): 9.

Beever, R. E. 1983: Paspalums - native or exotic? Auckland Botanical Society Newsletter 38(2): 11.

Beever, R. E. 1983: Pollination of Rhabdothamnus solandri: more observations needed. Auckland Botanical Society Newsletter 38(2): 24–25.

Beever, R. E. 1983: Self-incompatibility in Cordyline pumilio (Agavaceae). New Zealand Journal of Botany 21: 93–95.

Beever R. E., Beever, J. 1983: Frost damage to native plants 1982. Auckland Botanical Society Newsletter 38(2): 1–3.

Mackinder, J. A.;Beever, R. E.; Wright, A.; Rattenbury, J. A. 1983: Submission: Management plans, Mt Roskill Borough Council reserves. Auckland Botanical Society Newsletter 38(1): 1–2.

Beever, R. E. 1984: Fruit set and seed germination of Rhabdothamnus solandri (Gesneriaceae). Auckland Botanical Society Newsletter 39(2): 42–45.

Beever, R. E. 1984: Observations on puka (Meryta sinclairii) on the Chickens Islands with an assessment of the hypothesis that it was transferred there by the Maori. Tane 30: 77–92.

Beever, R. E.; Esler, A. E.; Wright, A. E. 1984: Botany of the large islands of the eastern Bay of Islands, northern New Zealand. Tane 30: 251–273.

[Beever, R. E.] [1985]: Submission: Waitakere Ranges Regional Park Land Management Plan May 1984 draft. Auckland Botanical Society Newsletter 40: 1–4.

Beever, R. E. 1985: Pukemokemoke, a forest remnant in the Waikato. Auckland Botanical Society Newsletter 40: 8–12.

Beever, R. E. 1986: A plant list for Pukekaroro Scenic Reserve, Kaiwaka, North Auckland. Auckland Botanical Society Newsletter 41: 43–45.

Beever, R. E. 1986: Large-leaved plants of the northern offshore islands, New Zealand. Pp. 51–61 in: Wright, A. E.; Beever, R. E. ed. The Offshore Islands of Northern New Zealand, Proceedings of Symposium convened by the Offshore Islands Research Group, 10–13 May, 1983, Auckland New Zealand Department of Lands and Survey, Information Series, No. 16.

Beever, R. E. 1986: The species of Cordyline (Agavaceae) on the Poor Knights Islands, northern New Zealand. Journal of the Royal Society of New Zealand 16: 251–258.

Beever, R. E. 1987: The holes in the leaves of kawakawa (Macropiper excelsum). Auckland Botanical Society Newsletter 42: 9–11.

Beever, R. 1987: Obituary – Lucy Beatrice Moore, 1906–1987. Auckland Botanical Society Newsletter 42: 34–35.

Beever, R. E. 1987: Farthest north – botanical notes on the North Cape area. Auckland Botanical Society Newsletter 42: 49–52.

Beever, R. E. 1987: Root grafting in puriri. Auckland Botanical Society Newsletter 42: 71–72.

Beever, R. 1988: Gumland scrub. Auckland Botanical Society Journal 43: 12–16.

Beever, R. E. 1989: Whence "Cordyline kirkii"? New Zealand Botanical Society Newsletter No. 18: 13–14.

Beever, J. E.;Beever, R. E. 1989: Report on Waima-Waipoua-Mataraua forests field trip January 1989. Auckland Botanical Society Journal 44: 29–30.

Beever, R. E.; Brownsey, P. J.; Bellingham, R. M. 1989: New records of vascular plants from D’Uurville Island, Marlborough Sounds. Wellington Botanical Society Bulletin 45: 116–119.

Wright, A.;Beever, R. 1990: Hukatere Scenic Reserve, 17 February 1990. Auckland Botanical Society Journal 45: 47–49.

Redgewell, R. J.; Beever, R. E.; Bieleski, R. L.; Laracy, E. P.; Benn, M. H. 1990: Isolation and characterisation of (E)‑4‑(hydroxy-2‑(hydroxymethyl)but‑2‑enyl ß‑D‑allo-pyranoside, the major soluble carbohydrate in leaves of the fern Cardiomanes reniforme. Carbohydrate Research 198: 39–48.

Beever, R. E. 1991: Book review. Checklist of Phormium Cultivars. Horticulture in New Zealand 2(2): 29.

Galloway, T.; Beever, R. E.; Warne, K. 1992: Anatomy of a cabbage tree. New Zealand Geographic 14: (48)–(49).

Beever, R. E.; Parkes, S. L. 1996: Self-incompatibility in Cordyline australis (Asteliaceae). New Zealand Journal of Botany 34: 135–137.

Beever, R. E. 1997: Book review. New Zealand Coast and Mountain Plants - their Communities and Lifestyles. New Zealand Garden Journal 2(3): 24.

Beever, R. 1997: Auckland Botanical Society, Special General Meeting, 3 September 1997. Auckland Botanical Society Journal 52: 51–53.

Beever, J.; Beever, R.; Cashmore, P.; Silbery, T. 1998: Bulls Clearing Reserve. Pp. 18–19 in: W:ilcox, M. (compiler) Puketitiri and Kaweka Range, Hawke’s Bay, 23–26 January 1998. Auckland Botanical Society Journal 53: 16–24.

Harris, W.; Beever, R. E.; Heenan, P. B. 1998: Phenotypic variation of leaves and stems of wild stands of Cordyline australis (Lomandraceae). New Zealand Journal of Botany 36: 593–604.

Silbery, T.; Cashmore, P.; Beever, J.; Beever, R. 1998: Hutchinson Scenic reserve. P. 19 in: Wilcox, M. (compiler) Puketitiri and Kaweka Range, Hawke’s Bay, 23–26 January 1998. Auckland Botanical Society Journal 53: 16–24.

Beever, R.; Beever, J.; McSweeney, C. 1999: Expedition to Cuvier Island (Repanga), and Coromandel Peninsula, 1999. Auckland Botanical Society Journal 54: 32–33.

Beever, R.; Davidson, G. 1999: Pennantia baylisiana project. Auckland Botanical Society Journal 54: 31.

Harris, W.; Beever, R. E. 2000: Genotypic variation of seedlings of wild populations of Cordyline australis (Lomandraceae) in New Zealand. New Zealand Journal of Botany 38: 595–606.

Beever, R. 2001: Lucy Cranwell Lecture – introduction, & Allan Mere Award, October 2000. Auckland Botanical Society Journal 56: 1–2.

Harris, W.; Beever, R. E.; Smallfield, B. 2001: Variation in response to cold damage by populations of Cordyline australis and some other species of Cordyline (Lomandraceae). New Zealand Journal of Botany 39: 147–159.

Harris, W.; Beever, R. E. 2002: Genotypic variation of leaf characteristics of wild populations of Cordyline australis (Lomandraceae) in New Zealand. New Zealand Journal of Botany 40: 457–472.

Harris, W. Beever, R. E.; Webster, R.; Parkes, S.; Scheele, S. 2003: Genotypic variation of height growth and trunk diameter of Cordyline australis (Lomandraceae) grown at three locations in New Zealand. New Zealand Journal of Botany 41: 637–653.

Harris, W. Beever, R. E.; Parkes, S. L.; McSeveny, T. 2004: Genotypic variation of dead leaf retention by Cordyline australis (Lomandraceae) populations and influence on trunk surface temperatures. New Zealand Journal of Botany 42: 833–845.

Harris, W.; Beever, R. E.; Parkes, S. L.; Smallfield, B; Andersen, R-A.; Scheele, S. 2006: Genotypic variation of the flowering phenology of Cordyline australis (Laxmanniaceae) grown at three locations in New Zealand. New Zealand Journal of Botany 44: 23–39.

Young, M.; Beever, R. 2009: Geoff Davidson, Honorary Life Member, Auckland Botanical Society. Auckland Botanical Society Journal 64:103–106.

 

A. R. Ferguson FRSNZ, FNZIAHS
Plant & Food Research, Mt Albert, Auckland

 

Information lodged on website on Tuesday, 26 October 2010