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The State of Māori Rights—Margaret Mutu (2011)

The State of Māori Rights brings together a set of articles written between 1994 and 2009. It places on record the Māori view of events and issues that took place over these years—issues that have been more typically reported to the general public from a ‘mainstream’ media perspective.

Publication details

Mutu, M. The State of Māori Rights. Wellington: Huia Publishers, 2011

About the book

University of Auckland Professor of Māori Studies and renowned scholar, Professor Margaret Mutu (Ngāti Kahu, Te Rarawa, Ngāti Whātua), is a new Fellow of the Royal Society of New Zealand Te Apārangi. Mutu’s pioneering research spans Māori language, tikanga (law), history and traditions, rights and sovereignty, Te Tiriti o Waitangi and treaty claims against the Crown, constitutional transformation and Māori-Chinese encounters. Mutu has made a significant scholarly contribution by, reshaping oral traditions into a western form that is comprehensible and admissible within the Pākehā legal system; overturning accepted histories; and dismantling established theories of colonisation. Professor Mutu’s 2011 publication The State of Māori Rights (2011) is an example of the calibre of her contribution to the depth and breadth of scholarship. This publication is a critical analysis of events and issues between 1994 and 2009 that directly impacted on Māori. It is significant because it places on record the Māori view of events and issues that took place over these years—issues that have been more typically reported to the general public from a ‘mainstream’ media perspective. It documents a 15-year period that saw a shift in Māori consciousness resulting in an increased determination of Māori to assert rangatiratanga – self-determination as the indigenous people of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Further information 

Availability: Purchase from Huia

 

This publication is part of the series Te Takarangi: Celebrating Māori publications - a sample list of 150 non-fiction books produced by a partnership between Royal Society Te Apārangi and Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga.