Explore as a

International Indigenous Rights in Aotearoa New Zealand – Andrew Erueti (Ed.) 2017

This collection of essays places the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in the context of New Zealand rights around such issues as Treaty settlements, mining policy and the status of Māori children.

Publication details

Erueti, A. (Ed.). International Indigenous Rights in Aotearoa New Zealand. Wellington: Victoria University Press, 2017.

About the book

Over the past four decades, international indigenous rights have become a prominent aspect of international law and are now enshrined in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Yet, while endorsed by Aotearoa New Zealand in 2010, little remains known about how these standards came about, how the international movement that created them was established, and the implications of these standards on national reforms already protecting Māori rights. This book seeks to answer those questions.

Andrew Erueti (Ngā Ruahinerangi and Ngāti Ruanui and Ati Hau) lectures in indigenous and Māori rights in the Law Faculty of the University of Auckland and has edited this collection of essays that place the Declaration in the context of New Zealand rights around such issues as Treaty settlements, mining policy and the status of Māori children.

Further information 

This publication is part of the series Te Takarangi: Celebrating Māori publications - a sample list of 150 non-fiction books produced by a partnership between Royal Society Te Apārangi and Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga.