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Cooper Medal

The Cooper Medal was awarded biennially for research published in the fields of physics and engineering of particular merit or addressing a specific need in New Zealand. It has been replaced by the Cooper Award for early career researchers.

Background of the Medal

Dr E. R. Cooper was the first Director of the Dominion Physical Laboratory from 1939 to 1950. He subsequently held the position of Assistant Secretary (Physics and Engineering) of the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research until his untimely death in 1952.

On the initiative of the Technical Advisory Committee of the Dominion Physical Laboratory, a fund was collected for the purpose of establishing an E. R. Cooper Medal, to be awarded every two years to the author of the best account of research work carried out in New Zealand in physics or engineering. In 1965, the Council of the Royal Society of New Zealand formally accepted responsibility for the administration of the Cooper Medal. The E. R. Cooper Memorial Fund was transferred to the Society by the Technical Advisory Committee of the Dominion Physical Laboratory in memory of the late Edmund Roy Cooper, to support the award of the medal and prize for the encouragement of scientific research in the fields of physics or engineering.

Until and including 2016, the Cooper Medal was awarded biennially to the researcher (or researchers) who, working within New Zealand, has published original research within the fields of physics and engineering that is of particular merit and either adresses a specific need, or is likely to have beneficial impact, in or for New Zealand.

It was agreed that from 2017 the Cooper Medal for engineering be discontinued, that the name be changed to the Cooper Award and that this award be open to Early Career Researchers in Technology, Applied Sciences and Engineering.

Recipients

 

2016

No award

2014

No award

2012

Mark Poletti - for his world-leading development of the globally preferred method for tuning concert hall acoustics.

2010

Marcus King - for his innovative development of a low-cost, high performance computer-based system for upper-limb rehabilitation for people suffering neurological injury or disease. A suite of computer games of gradually increasing complexity and degree of physical movement provides feedback to the patient on progress, and the fun aspect of the exercises provides motivation over the long times needed for rehabilitation.

2008

IRL Superconductor Cable Team:
Nicholas Long
Rod Badcock
Peter Beck
Marc Mulholland
Nigel Ross
Michael Staines
Henry Sun
James Hamilton
Robert Buckley FRSNZ

(for innovative research identifying a commercial process for the manufacture of superconductor cable with significant potential economic benefit to New Zealand.)

2006

Yonghe Liu

2004

Peter Saunders

2002

X. Dong Chen FRSNZ

2000

No award

1998

David Rodney White

1996

Thomas Heinrich Barnes

1994

William H. Robinson FRSNZ
Robert Ivan Skinner FRSNZ
Graeme McVerry

1991

Paul Terence Callaghan FRSNZ

1990

No award

1988

No award

1986

No award

1984

Richard L. Earle
Andrew C. Cleland

1982

Garth Alan Carnaby

1980

Richard H. T. Bates FRSNZ
David J. N. Wall

1978

Van Thanh Nguyen
Peter Leigh Speddin

1976

No award

1974

Geoffrey Graeme Duffy
Klaus Molle
Alan Lee Titchener

1972

Robin Shepherd

1970

Charles Russell James

1968

Robert Sidney Unwin

1966

Douglas George Dell

1964

John Banwell

1962

Michael Gadsden

1960

Gordon John Fergusson

1958

Clifton Darfield Ellyett